News

Wheelhouse Weekly – June 30th, 2020

Volume 25… Number 25… June 30, 2020

STORIES COVERED

In This Issue:

Also:

News for MM&P Members:

And:


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MM&P AND MEBA ENDORSE MERCHANT MARINE ADVOCATE AND LIFELONG LABOR SUPPORTER JOE BIDEN IN PRESIDENTIAL RACE

MM&P and the Marine Engineers’ Beneficial Association have announced their endorsement of Vice President Joseph R. Biden in the race for President of the United States.

Biden has been a strong supporter of the US-flag fleet and a champion of working Americans throughout his professional life.

MM&P President Don Marcus and MEBA President Marshall Ainley informed the Vice President of the endorsement in a joint letter.

“During your tenured career of public service, you have stood strongly in support of the Jones Act, voted for the Maritime Security Act of 1996 that established the 60-vessel Maritime Security Program, and worked to ensure the long-term viability of the US-flag commercial fleet through our nation’s cargo preference laws,” the union presidents wrote on June 17.

“Your longstanding record in support of these policies recognizes the vital role American mariners play in advancing our economic and national security.”

“Your strong record in support of the labor movement speaks for itself through various laws that have expanded the wages, health care and retirement security of the hardworking men and women we represent.”

In his response, Biden underlined the crucial role that American mariners have always played in maintaining our country’s defense, security and economic strength.

“Maritime labor has always worked through peace and war and deserves our nation’s full support,” Biden said.

“I know your members are working around the clock during this pandemic to deliver the essential supplies our communities need.”

“As a lifelong advocate for working families and unions, I write to assure you of my strong and unwavering support for the [members of MM&P and MEBA] and the U.S.-flag Merchant Marine fleet.”

“Labor unions built the middle class and the middle class built this country.”

“The basic building blocks of a good life––middle-class jobs at union wages, a 40-hour work week, health insurance, retirement benefits, a voice in the workplace––resulted from workers who organized unions and fought for worker protections.”

“And at a time when our country is facing unprecedented challenges, our economic future today depends on unions like yours…”

“Just as unions are essential to the middle class, the US-flag Merchant Marine fleet and the men and women who operate US-flag ships are crucial to America’s national security, our international trade relationships, and economic development.”

“For this reason, I have been a consistent and strong advocate for the Jones Act and its mandate that only US-flag vessels carry cargo in the coastwise trade. As President, I will continue my strong support for the Jones Act.”

“My support for the US-flag merchant fleet does not end with the Jones Act. I understand that merchant ships do not sail, and US merchant mariners do not work, unless they have cargo to carry.”

“I strongly support America’s cargo preference laws and the Cargo Preference Act.”

“Americans have big hearts while also caring deeply about defending democracy and America’s allies around the world.”

“The surest expression of America’s commitment to these values is to ensure that the US flag flies over the US-built and US-crewed vessels that are delivering humanitarian aid or military supplies to countries around the world.”

“I also understand that exporting American-made goods to countries around the world is an effective strategy for increasing the number of middle-class jobs.”

“That’s one reason I strongly support the extended reauthorization of the Export-Import Bank and will ensure that it is able to operate at all times with a fully staffed board of directors committed to carrying out its mission.”

“Exports funded by the Export-Import Bank should be shipped on US-flag vessels. I will ensure this American cargo continues to move.”

“The Maritime Security Program is essential to America’s national defense and it has my strong support.”

“I understand that your members and the ships they sail are an integral and necessary part of our country’s military readiness. As a US Senator, I was proud to support the creation of the MSP in 1996 to enact the Maritime Security Act.”

“As President, I will support full funding of the MSP’s existing operating agreements, but I will go further: I will propose that Congress authorize and appropriate funds to increase the number of ships in the MSP fleet.”

“We must have a modern fleet to help us address modern threats in several regions of the world. The MSP must be secured if America is going to remain secure.”

“I want you to know that I will continue the fight alongside you when I am in the White House.”

“These are principles I’ve embraced my entire career and they’re fundamental to my vision for a stronger, more inclusive middle class.”

“I’m proud to have stood with you in the past and it would be an honor to have your support in the upcoming election.”

“If I win the nomination and make it to the White House, I promise you will have no stronger partner or advocate.”

Back to Stories Covered


SOME PROGRESS ON CREW CHANGE, BUT THOUSANDS OF SEAFARERS REMAIN STRANDED

Canada, Hong Kong, and Singapore are among the countries that have responded in recent weeks to calls to address obstacles to the crew change process.

The Maritime and Port Authority of Singapore announced it had introduced online crew health checks—via telemedicine—and established an “environmentally safe corridor” that has helped it process 13,000 crew changes since the end of March.

The MPA said it had also obtained thousands of face coverings to protect signing-off seafarers on their journey home.

The International Transport Workers’ Federation and the International Maritime Organization marked the tenth anniversary of the Day of the Seafarer, June 25, with renewed calls for action.

The ITF called it “a day for somber reflection on how seafarers continue to be let down when they deserve so much more.”

The ITF and its Joint Employers Group have pursued diplomatic avenues, lobbied the European Commission and met with flag states in their efforts to improve the situation.

In an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal, IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim noted that thousands of international seafarers have had their contracts involuntarily extended because travel and visa restrictions, along with limitations imposed by governments, have kept reliefs from getting to ships.

“I strongly support and urge all governments to implement the industry-developed protocols to ensure crew changes can occur safely and efficiently,” he wrote.

“Not only is this essential to maintain the global supply chain, for humanitarian reasons crew changes cannot be postponed indefinitely.”

The IMO has joined other UN organizations, labor unions and companies in asking governments to designate marine personnel as “key workers” since they play an essential role in maintaining the flow of food, medicines and critical supplies.

But despite progress in some countries, in others rules are being tightened.

New Zealand, for example, had said it would relax its restrictions. But after new cases of the virus were reported, the prime minister has required crews arriving in the country to undergo a 14-day quarantine unless they have been at sea for 28 days prior to arrival.

Recently, the Philippine Bureau of Immigration reported that since the beginning of the pandemic, it has processed and cleared more than 16,000 Filipino and foreign seafarers, mainly off cruise ships anchored in Manila Bay.

Currently, a total of 25 cruise ships are anchored in Manila Bay with five additional cruise ships in the waters outside Manila.

Back to Stories Covered


UNION SHIPBUILDERS IN MAINE CONTINUE STRIKE OVER COMPANY’S USE OF SUBCONTRACTORS

A strike by about 4,300 shipbuilders at Bath Iron Works is now in its second week.

BIW, among the largest employers in the state of Maine, is one of the Navy’s five biggest shipbuilders.

At issue is the company’s increasing use of subcontractors to do the work of members of International Association of Machinists Local S6.

“Despite our repeated warnings to the management of Bath Iron Works, this employer has continued to take taxpayer dollars and outsource good Maine jobs to out-of-state contractors,” said IAM President Robert Martinez Jr.

“The company is engaged in flat-out union-busting and is exploiting the current pandemic to attempt to outsource work from its dedicated employees, who are risking their health to build ships that protect our national security.”

IAM’s last strike at the shipyard, which took place 20 years ago, lasted 55 days.

A spokesperson for the union said that although the company has said it is ready to talk, it has refused to negotiate on the issue of subcontractors.

The union is now requesting help from a federal mediator. The company would have to agree to mediation.

An IAM spokesperson said union members—87 percent of whom voted in favor of the strike–are frustrated at the company’s “uninterest in talking” but are in good spirits and are prepared to strike for as long as necessary.

More than 1,000 of them were on the picket line last week.

The president of Local S6, Chris Wiers, says union representatives have offered alternatives to the use of subcontractors, but BIW “refused to implement those ideas, even on a trial basis.”

“Please ask yourselves how we built ships on time and often under budget with union contracts that were far less prohibitive for more than 100 years,” Wiers says.

“Simple: managers came off the deck plates with years of shipbuilding knowledge and trusted their employees’ input.”

In a letter to the union, Rep. Jared Golden (D-Maine) said that he is “100% in support” of the picket line.

“As skilled shipbuilders, you are a vital asset to America and you deserve fair pay for a hard day’s work,” he wrote.

“Subcontracting may seem like a good solution today, but you know the saying: ‘Good work ain’t cheap and cheap work ain’t good.’”

Back to Stories Covered


TRANSPORTATION UNIONS CALL ON CONGRESS TO EXTEND PAYROLL AID TO AIRLINES THROUGH MARCH 2021

More help from Congress is needed to keep hundreds of thousands of aviation sector workers employed, the AFL-CIO Transportation Trades Department and five affiliate unions told top lawmakers last week.

The unions are asking for $32 billion in additional government aid to maintain the jobs of their members through the end of March.

In a letter to leaders of the House of Representatives and the Senate, the union presidents said the increase in the number of coronavirus cases registered in some states has greatly lessened the possibility that air traffic will rebound by the end of the year.

Passenger and cargo airlines, as well as airline contractors, received $32 billion in federal aid to continue paying workers under the $2 trillion CARES Act that was signed into law in March.

Terms of that aid prohibit the airlines from laying off or cutting the pay rates of employees through Sept. 30.

Additional help is needed, the unions wrote.

“Air travel remains a slight fraction of last year’s levels and demand will remain depressed well into next year,” they said in their June 25 letter.

“Aviation workers account for 5 percent of the nation’s GDP. Should October 1 arrive without extending the PSP grant job program mass layoffs are inevitable, as airline executives have acknowledged.”

“Hundreds of thousands of workers will lose their jobs and health insurance—not only in aviation, but across our entire economy.”

“Further, the industry would lose a large portion of the experienced and credentialed workforce that will be critical to bringing the sector and the broader economy back to prosperity once the crisis is over.”

“Airline industry employment cannot simply be put back together overnight, and mass layoffs will do great damage to the sector, with potentially irrevocable consequences.”

“Only through an extension of PSP grants can Congress ensure that airline workers will continue to stay on payroll and ready to turn the industry around, prevent mass unemployment in October, and keep aviation workers ready to lift off as travel picks back up,” they wrote.

The letter was signed by TTD and the Air Line Pilots Association, the Association of Flight Attendants-CWA, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, the Transport Workers Union and the Communications Workers of America.

MM&P is one of the 33 transportation sector unions that belong to TTD.

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UN SAYS ABANDONED OIL TANKER OFF YEMENI COAST AT RISK OF EXPLODING

An oil tanker moored for years off the coast of Yemen has deteriorated to the point that it is now at risk of exploding, according to a report by the United Nations.

The 1970s-built vessel, FSO SAFER, was purchased by the Yemeni government in the 1980s to store oil for export.

It has had no crew aboard for several years because of the conflict raging in the area.

Documents obtained by The Associated Press show that seawater has entered the engine compartment, causing damage to pipelines. Drone footage shows that sections of the vessel are covered with rust.

The inert gas that prevents flammable material from accumulating in its 34 tanks has leaked out, the UN says.

If it ruptures or explodes, all parties agree, its cargo of 1 million barrels of crude oil will cause massive environmental damage to Red Sea marine life and disrupt ship traffic.

The UN has been trying for years to remove the oil from FSO SAFER and bring it into port, but the Iranian-backed Houthi rebels and the Saudi-led coalition have blocked all attempts.

Since 2015, maintenance of the ship has come to a complete halt.

Most crewmembers were removed after the Saudis imposed a land, sea and air embargo to dislodge the Houthis from the capital, Sanaa, and neighboring areas.

Because of the proximity of the tanker to the contested port of Hodeida, fears have grown that a stray shell or bullet could hit it, causing a massive explosion or oil leak into the Red Sea.

Over the past two years, the Yemeni government in exile, the UN and western diplomats have been sounding the alarm and putting pressure on the Houthis to secure the tanker—but to no avail.

The Saudis have also reportedly interfered with attempts to resolve the situation.

A recent internal government memo obtained by the AP shows that earlier this month, a diving team was dispatched by the state-run oil company that owns the tanker to seal holes in the ship that have allowed seawater to leak into the engine room.

The divers were able to make repairs, but it remain unclear if the work will hold, according to the June 13 report.

“We believe that the plugs/seals that were installed to prevent the entry of seawater into the engine room space will not withstand/hold long,” the report read.

The UN’s projects arm, UNOPS, put out a tender to hire an international agency to inspect the vessel after an initial agreement with the Houthis.

But the Houthis backed out of the agreement before a repair crew could be sent to Yemen.

The UN has repeatedly warned that delays in taking action to fix the FSO SAFER could lead to a man-made environmental disaster in the Red Sea four times greater than the 1989 EXXON VALDEZ oil spill.

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MM&P CLOSED ON JULY 3; PACIFIC PORTS ALSO CLOSED JULY 6 FOR BLOODY THURSDAY

All MM&P union halls, the MM&P Federal Credit Union, the MM&P Plan Office and MM&P headquarters will be closed on Friday, July 3, for Independence Day.

Pacific Ports–with the exception of Hawaii–will also be closed on Monday, July 6 for the ILWU holiday Bloody Thursday, in memory of the union members who were shot and killed during the 1934 maritime strike.

Back to Stories Covered


MITAGS EAST AND WEST COVID-19 POLICIES NOW ONLINE

The MITAGS East/Maritime Conference Center and MITAGS West Covid-19 policies have been posted on the MITAGS home page at https://www.mitags.org/

It’s particularly important that you read our latest policies for each campus, as they are slightly different for Seattle and Baltimore.

The MITAGS East/MCC policy is posted at: https://tinyurl.com/Mitags-East-MCC

The MITAGS West policy is posted at: https://tinyurl.com/MITAGS-West

Please keep in mind that this is a very fluid situation.

We will continue to update our website and keep you informed in as timely a matter as possible.

Back to Stories Covered


MITAGS ACADEMIC NOTES

\\Classes are 5-day unless otherwise noted\\

Class dates followed by an * are full

AB – Able Seaman –8/17/20, 10/5/20

AIS-1 – Automatic Identifications Systems Orientation (1-Day): 9/4/20

ARPA-OIC (4-Day) – Automated Radar Plotting Aids: 9/22/20

AZIPOD (2-Day) – 7/18/20, 10/5/20

BRM-35 – Bridge Resource Management: 8/3/20, 9/28/20

BRMP –Bridge Resource Management for Pilots (2-Day): 7/13/20, 9/15/20

BRMP-EMR –Bridge Resource Management for Pilots with Emergency Shiphandling – (Now also included in BRMP-Refresher) (3-Day): 7/15/20, 10/7/20

BRMP-Refresher (Now including Emergency Shiphandling for Pilots) (3-Day) – Not currently scheduled

BT – Basic Safety Training: 8/10/20, 10/12/20

BT-Revalidation (2-day) (Must have 1 year of sea service in last 5 years) – 7/28/20, 8/31/20, 9/23/20, 10/28/20, 12/15/20

BT-Refresher (3-day) – 7/27/20, 9/23/20, 12/14/20

CHS-OIC – Cargo Handling Basic: 10/26/20

[CMM – Chief Mate and Master Courses]

ADVSTB-CMM – Advanced Stability: 7/27/20, 10/5/20, 11/30/20

ADVWX-CMM – Advanced Meteorology: 8/3/20, 9/28/20, 12/7/20

CHS-CMM – Advanced Cargo Operations (10 Days): 10/12/20

CM-OPS 1 – Chief Mate Operations – Week 1: 8/24/20*, 11/9/20

CM-OPS 2 Maersk – Chief Mate Operations II Maersk Specific: 8/31/20*, 11/16/20

CM-OPS 2 APL – Chief Mate Operations II APL Specific – Not currently scheduled

ECDIS – Electronic Chart Display Information Systems: 8/17/20, 11/9/20

LMS – Leadership and Managerial Skills (Management Level – Formerly MCL-CMM): 8/10/20, 11/16/20, 12/14/20

MPP-CMM – Marine Propulsion Plants: 9/14/20 (DCS-1 available on request – contact Admissions)

SEC-APPS – Practical Defense Tactics: Not Currently Scheduled

SHMGT-CMM- Ship Management: 9/21/20

SHS-ADV-I-CMM – Advanced Shiphandling (week 1): 7/20/20, 8/10/20, 9/14/20, 9/28/20, 10/12/20, 11/2/20, 1/30/20

SHS-ADV-II-CMM – Advanced Shiphandling (week 2): 7/27/20, 8/17/20, 9/21/20, 10/5/20, 10/19/20, 11/9/20, 12/7/20

**SHS-ADV-I & II are now approved to include SAR-CMM assessments at MITAGS**

VPEN-CMM – Voyage Planning & Electronic Navigation: 11/2/20

WKP-CMM – Advanced Watchkeeping: 10/26/20

WX-HW-ATL – Heavy Weather Avoidance Routing: Atlantic Ocean (2-day) – Contact Admissions

WX-HW-IND – Heavy Weather Avoidance Routing: Indian Ocean (2-day) – Contact Admissions

WX-HW-PAC – Heavy Weather Avoidance Routing: Pacific Ocean (2-day) – Contact Admissions

CIW-DPA/IA – Continual Improvement Workshop: Designated Person Ashore & Internal Auditor (3-Day) ** This course is NOT covered by the MATES Program ** – 10/14/20

CIW-SMS – Continual Improvement Workshop: Successful Safety Management (2-Day) – Not currently scheduled

CNAV-OIC (15-Day) – Celestial Navigation: 11/2/20

CRISIS-COMMS – Crisis Communications (1-Day): Not currently scheduled

CRSMGT – Crisis Management and Human Behavior (1-Day) – Not currently scheduled

CDMGT – Crowd Management (1-Day) – Not currently scheduled

CSE – Confined Space Entry (3-Day): Not currently scheduled

CSE-AWR – Confined Space Entry Awareness (2-Day): Not currently scheduled

CY-MAR – Cyber-Skilled Mariner ** This course is NOT covered by the MATES Program ** – Not currently scheduled

DDE – Great Lakes (20-Day): Not currently scheduled

ECDIS for Pilots (2-Day) – 7/20/20

ERM – Engine Resource Management: 8/17/20, 12/7/20

ADV-FF – Advanced Fire-Fighting (4-day) – Not currently scheduled

FF-BADV – Fire Fighting Combined Basic & Advanced: 8/10/20, 10/12/20

FF-ADV-Rev (1-day) (Must have 1 year of sea service in last 5 years) – Advanced Fire Fighting Revalidation: 7/30/20, 9/2/20, 9/22/20, 10/27/20, 12/17/20

FF-ADV-REF (2-day) – Advanced Fire Fighting Refresher: 7/25/20, 9/26/20, 12/12/20

FSM – Fatigue, Sleep, & Medications (1-Day): 9/15/20

GL-Pilot – Great Lakes Pilotage Familiarization (2-Day): Not currently scheduled

GMDSS – Global Maritime Distress and Safety System (10-Day): Not currently scheduled

HAZ – Hazardous Materials (5 day): 8/24/20, 11/16/20

IEN – Integrated Electronic Navigation (3-Day) – Not currently scheduled

LAP – License Advancement Program for Mate to Master (20-Day): 7/27/20, 9/28/20

LAP-Great Lakes – License Advancement Program – Great Lakes (15-Day): Not currently scheduled

LAP-ORG3rd – License Advancement Program for Original 3rd Mate, Oceans, Any Gross
Ton License (15-Day): Contact Admissions

LEG – Legal Aspects of Pilotage (1-Day): 9/16/20

LNG-TPIC (10-Day) – 11/30/20

LTS –Leadership and Teamworking Skills (Formerly MCL-OIC) (1-Day): 9/21/20

MEECE – Management of Electrical and Electronic Control Equipment (Assessments not included): 8/24/20, 11/30/20

MED-PIC – Medical Person in Charge (10-Day): 7/6/20, 9/28/20, 11/30/20

MED-PIC-REF– Medical Person in Charge Refresher: 8/17/20, 10/19/20

MED-PRO – Medical Care Provider: 9/28/20, 11/30/20

MED-DOT-DA – Dept. of Transportation Drug & Alcohol Testing (1-Day): 7/11/20, 9/3/20, 9/21/20, 10/3/20, 10/26/20, 12/5/20, 12/18/20

[MSC – Military Sealift Command Courses]

MSC-CBRD-1 – Military Sealift Command Chemical, Biological, Radiological Defense Orientation (Basic) (1-Day): 8/5/20, 9/11/20, 11/10/20

MSC-DC – Military Sealift Command Damage Control (2-day): 8/3/20, 9/9/20, 10/30/20

MSC-ENVPRO (1-Day) – 8/2/20, 11/1/20

MSC-FF-HELO (2-Day) – 10/28/20

MSC-SMA – Military Sealift Command Small Arms Qualifications (4-Day): 7/6/20, 8/9/20, 9/14/20, 11/2/20

MSC-Security Watch Basic (1-Day) – 8/6/20, 9/12/20, 11/2/20

MSC-Security Watch Advanced (1-Day) – 7/10/20, 8/8/20, 9/13/20, 11/6/20

MSC-Ship’s Reaction Force (3-Day) – 7/11/20, 8/14/20, 9/18/20, 11/7/20

NDMS-ENAV – Navigational Decision Making Series – Best Practice in eNav (3-Day) – 11/30/20

NSAP-MMP – Navigational Skills Assessment Program-MM&P (2-Day) – 7/13/20*, 8/31/20*, 9/2/20*, 10/26/20, 10/28/20, 12/14/20, 12/16/20

PSC – Personal Survival Craft (5-Day) – 10/19/20

PSC-REF – Personal Survival Craft Refresher (2-Day) – 7/30/20, 12/10/20

RFPNW – Ratings Forming Part of a Navigational Watch (3-day) – 9/30/20

ROR-1 – Radar Observer Renewal (1-Day): 9/21/20

ROR-1N – Radar Observer Renewal Evening Classes (1-Night): 7/27/20, 9/15/20, 12/14/20

ROU-OIC – Radar Observer Program – Unlimited: Not currently scheduled

SAR – Search & Rescue – (Now with OIC and CMM assessments) (3-Day): 10/14/20, 11/30/20

SHS-BAS-OIC – Basic Shiphandling: 8/24/20, 10/19/20

SHS-EMR5 – Emergency Shiphandling (5 Day) – 7/13/20, 8/31/20*, 11/16/20*, 12/14/20

STB-OIC – Ship Construction and Basic Stability: 8/3/20

TCNAV/CO – Terrestrial Navigation and Compasses (15-Day): 7/6/20

TPIC – Tankerman Person in Charge: 7/6/20

TRAC-TUG-2 (2-Day): Not currently scheduled

TTT – ** This course is NOT covered by the MATES Program ** Not currently scheduled

VPDSD – Vessel Personnel with Designated Security Duties (1-Day): Not Currently Scheduled

VSO – Vessel Security Officer (3-Day): 9/9/20

WKP-OIC – Watchkeeping (Operational Level) (10-Day): 10/5/20

WX-OIC –Meteorology (Operational Level): 9/14/20

Back to Stories Covered


MITAGS-WEST ACADEMIC NOTES

Schedule of Courses – Please also see our schedule and enroll online at www.mitags.org

For Registration Contact our Admissions Department: 206.441.2880 or admissions@mates.org

July 2020

6-10 Ship Construction and Basic Stability
6-10 Leadership & Managerial Skills
13-24 Watchkeeping (Operational Level)
15th Advanced Firefighting Revalidation
16-17 Basic Training Revalidation
20-24 Basic Training
27-29 Security Officer – Vessel, Company and Facility
27-31 Basic Shiphandling

August 2020

3-7 Able Seaman
3-7 Advanced Firefighting
10-14 Basic Training
10-28 Terrestrial and Coastal Navigation
17-18 Basic Training Revalidation
19th Advanced Firefighting Revalidation
20-21 Advanced Firefighting Refresher
31-4 Radar Observer Unlimited

September 2020

14-18 Engine Resource Management
14-18 Basic Training
14-2 License Preparation (OICNW)
21-25 Management of Electrical and Electronic Control Equipment (MEECE)
21-2 GMDSS
28-29 Basic Training Revalidation
30th Advanced Firefighting Revalidation

October 2020

12-16 ECDIS
12-16 Ship Construction and Basic Stability
12-16 Basic Training
12-16 Medical Care Provider
12-23 Medical Person-In-Charge
19-20 Basic Training Revalidation
19-23 Advanced Meteorology
19-6 Celestial Navigation
21st Medical DOT
22nd Advanced Firefighting Revalidation
26-29 Advanced Firefighting
26-30 Advanced Shiphandling I

November 2020

2-6 Advanced Shiphandling II
2-6 Radar Observer Unlimited
2-6 Basic Training
9-12 Advanced Firefighting
9-13 Leadership & Managerial Skills
9-13 Medical Care Provider
9-20 Medical Person-In-Charge
13th Advanced Firefighting Revalidation
16-17 Basic Training Revalidation
16-18 Security Officer – Vessel, Company and Facility
16-19 ARPA
16-20 Advanced Stability
30-4 Basic Training

December 2020

4, 7-8 Basic Training Refresher
7-8 Basic Training Revalidation
7-11 Medical Care Provider
7-18 Medical Person-In-Charge
9th Advanced Firefighting Revalidation
10-11 Advanced Firefighting Refresher

Back to Stories Covered


COMPLETE LIST OF MITAGS ONLINE AND BLENDED COURSES

We now offer blended learning options (https://www.mitags.org/blended-learning-courses/) for a variety of USCG and VA approved courses.

Blended learning involves online and in person learning. First, course materials will be delivered remotely, via an online platform.

The second portion of your course will be completed on campus since some USCG-approved courses require assessments (exams and practical exercises) to be completed in person.

Dates of in-person course completion will be determined at a later date.

MITAGS is currently able to offer the following blended learning courses.

Check individual courses often for any upcoming scheduled course dates.

New course sessions are being added regularly.

— Advanced Meteorology (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/advanced-meteorology-2/

— Basic Firefighting (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/basic-firefighting/

— Basic Training (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/basic-training-2/

— Basic Training Refresher (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/basictraining-refresher/

— Basic Training Revalidation (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/basic-training-revalidation-2/

— Cargo Handling & Stowage (Operational Level) (Blended) https://www.mitags.org/course/cargo-handling-stowage/

— Fatigue, Sleep & Medications (Online)
https://www.mitags.org/course/fatigue-sleep-medications-2/

— Leadership & Managerial Skills (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/leadership-managerial-skills/

— Personal Safety and Social Responsibilities (Blended) https://www.mitags.org/course/personal-safety-and-social-responsibilities-2/

— Personal Survival Techniques (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/personal-survival-techniques-2/

— Terrestrial Navigation and Compasses (Blended)
https://www.mitags.org/course/terrestrial-navigation-and-compasses/

Please contact us via e-mail if you have questions or concerns.

Admissions.east@mitags.org
Admissions.west@mitags.org

Back to Stories Covered


The MM&P Wheelhouse Weekly is the official electronic newsletter of the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots, 700 Maritime Blvd. Suite B, Linthicum Heights, MD 21090-1953. Phone: 410-850-8700; Fax: 410-850-0973. All rights reserved. The MM&P Wheelhouse Weekly © 2020. Articles can be reprinted without prior permission if credit is given to The MM&P Wheelhouse Weekly. For subscriptions, address changes or messages to the editor or to MM&P headquarters, e-mail communications@bridgedeck.org. Back issues of The Weekly are posted on www.bridgedeck.org